Category Archives: Project Management

Corrective Action / Preventive Action (CAPA)

CAPA Process
Hello good people of the world! Today’s post is about Corrective Action / Preventive Action, typically referred to as CAPA. CAPA is an integral part of any Quality System, and certainly one of the first things an agency will look at in any audit.

There is a ton of good information out there already on CAPA, including FDA’s own guidance from 2014.

I’ve personally used a few software packages for CAPA management, including MasterControl and Oracle’s Agile, among others, but have not seen any standouts.

The key points of the CAPA program are:

  1. Issue identification, i.e. ensuring the issue is truly understood and well documented
  2. Root cause analysis, i.e. identifying the root cause of the issue
  3. effectiveness check, i.e. verifying actions have actually resolved the issue

What tips have you learned from your CAPA program? Comment below.

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Free Offer! Get Your Org Chart Online and Organized

Portfolio10Hello good people of the world! As you probably know, one of the first things an agency is likely to ask for in an audit is your company’s organization chart. They want to know how the organization is structured, and particularly where the quality unit fits in.

If you have a SharePoint tenant, I have an offer for you. For a limited time, MWV, in conjunction with dikuw.com, is offering a free SharePoint Add-in for generating organization charts. This add-in integrates with your existing SharePoint On-Premise or Online service, and gives a secure, centralized location for your org chart. The custom interface makes it easy to navigate and update the chart in real-time.

Get all the details and download the add-in here: http://www.dikuw.com/OrgChart.html

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Start-Up Tip: Task Duration Buy-In

Buy In.jpg

Hello good people of the world! Today’s post might be a bit of a rant, but this is something I’m seeing lately and is a good way to kill your project schedule. What I’m talking about is task duration buy-in. It is critical in a start-up project to get all stakeholders and especially responsible parties to buy in to the amount of time they are allotted for each task in the schedule.

And I mean formal buy in. Get it in writing. Have them sign their name to it.

Too often I have seen a schedule suffer due to this gross oversight. Yes, a schedule may say you have three days to complete a task, but if that duration feels arbitrary or not “owned”, it is not going to be met when other priorities come in to play. This is especially true with resources that are not used to working in start-up environments/come from steady-state situations.

Get buy in, have consequences for failing to meet dates, force resources to delegate when they are overwhelmed.

What’s your go-to method for getting buy-in on task durations and keeping that schedule moving along?

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