Tag Archives: Pharmaceuticals

ORAL SOLID DOSE – Equipment Cleaning

Hello good people of the world! Continuing the series on oral solid dosage forms, today we’re going to talk about equipment cleaning. OSD manufacturing equipment can be notoriously hard to clean, and manual cleaning procedures introduce high risk of contamination and carryover. It is recommended that any new or existing process equipment be cleaned with automated processes wherever possible.

The three automated cleaning processes typically used in industry are:

  • Clean-in-Place (CIP)
  • Wash-in-Place (WIP)
  • Clean-out-of-Place (COP)

CIP is done without moving the equipment, as the name implies, and uses a CIP skid to deliver cleaning and rinse solutions. CIP should not require any manual operations.

WIP is done in-place as well, but may include some manual operations, such as removing filters.

COP requires equipment to be moved to a wash station. Tanks and vessels are typically COP’d.

Some specific concerns related to cleaning OSD equipment include:

  • Dry Granulator/Roller Compactor cannot typically be CIP’d. Particularly the auger must be removed and COP’d.
  • Fluid Bed Dryers a large and complex, making cleaning difficult. Modern dryers will include CIP/WIP but typically still require manual cleaning of some parts.
  • Milling equipment typically requires the screen to be manually removed before any CIP/WIP.
  • Tablet presses can be difficult to clean, requiring many manual interventions prior to washing.
  • Capsule filling machines should be wettable to allow cleaning.
  • Tablet coaters should include WIP

Of course, cleaning processes, whether automated or not, need to be validated. Riboflavin tests may be performed to verify wash coverage, and swabbing can verify lack of residual API and cleaning solutions.

What challenges have you run into in cleaning your OSD manufacturing equipment? Comment below!

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PLC/HMI IOQ – What to Test?

PLC

Hello good people of the world! Today’s post is on initial control system Installation and Operational Qualification (IOQ)¬†of a simple system consisting of an Human/Machine Interface (HMI), Programmable Logic Controller (PLC), and any number of end devices (valves, pumps, sensors, etc.). The question is what should be tested?

Obviously there’s a ton of guidance out there (see e.g.: GAMP) that will have a lot more detail than this post. The purpose here is to list at a high level the tests that could be expected. So let’s get started!

Installation Qualification
IQ can be its own protocol or combined with OQ in an IOQ for cases without a ton of complexity. IQ is supposed to verify the installation of hardware, software, and any peripherals. You also want to check what documentation is available/applicable here. IQ tests may include:

  • Documentation Verification (e.g. SOPs, EREC/ESIG assessment, operating/maintenance manuals, panel and electrical drawings, etc.)
  • Hardware Verification: verify the make and model of major components at a minimum
  • Software Verification: verify/record software versions. You’ve got to know what you’ll be OQ’ing!
  • Configuration Verification: verify any hardware and/or software configuration. This could be two tests, one for hardware, one for software.
  • Loop Check Verification: verify loop checks are performed.
  • Alarm Configuration Verification: ideally alarms a setup in such a way that you don’t have to functionality test them all!
  • Any other critical installation items

Operational Qualification
OQ is the meat of your control qualification. Here you want to test critical functions, that hopefully you have identified earlier (see here for one approach). OQ may test:

  • Interlock Verification including e-stops. A lot of interlocks are safety/business related, but they’re often included in OQ due to how critical they are.
  • Functional Alarm Verification – be sure to include data loss/communication alarms
  • HMI Navigation and Layout Verification
  • Restart/Recovery Verification
  • Sequence of Operations Verification

What kinds of testing are you sure to cover in your control system IOQ protocols? Comment below.

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Serialization Basics

vials
Hello good people of the world! Today’s post is high-level regarding serialization. Serialization is a process mandated by the world’s regulatory agencies to reduce counterfeit drug products in the market. Besides being costly to drug companies, counterfeit drug products are often less efficacious and less safe than the real drug they are purporting to be. Additionally, counterfeit drug products can be contaminated with other APIs and/or toxic excipients.
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